Release: Google Chrome 56

Google Chrome Browser Logo

Google has released version 56 of its web browser, based on the open-source Chromium web browser. There were 51 security-related bug fixes and one security researcher nabbed over thirty-thousand dollars ($30,000) for reporting some particularly nasty cross-site scripting (XSS) issues in Blink, Chrome’s rendering engine. Here are the other new and fixed features: For Users… Continue reading Release: Google Chrome 56

Chrome Changes: Encryption Notification

Google Chrome Browser Logo

Google Chrome version 56 (based on the open-source Chromium web browser) is scheduled to be released at the end of the month. One of the major user-level changes is how sites without encryption will appear. Until now there has just been a lowercase letter “i” with a circle around it — this was typically an indicator… Continue reading Chrome Changes: Encryption Notification

Google Chrome 55 Released

Google Chrome Browser Logo

Google has released version 55 of the Chrome web browser (based on the open-source Chromium browser) a few days early (was supposed to be released on the 6th). There was over $70,000 paid out to security experts, developers, and white-hat hackers for finding over 25 different security-related issues with the browser. Noteworthy features: async &… Continue reading Google Chrome 55 Released

Chrome Security Update: 45.0.2454.101

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Google has released a security update for it’s Chrome web browser. The new version, 45.0.2454.101, includes fixes for a reported cross-origin bypass that affects both the document object model (DOM) parser as well as the V8 JavaScript/ECMAScript engine. It is recommended that you update your browser to this version to prevent possible exploits. You can do so… Continue reading Chrome Security Update: 45.0.2454.101

Google’s Cell Service Play

Google's Project fi Logo

Google likes to jump into a number of businesses that involve technology. They are heavily involved in robotics and are developing a self-driving car, conduct a number of research projects, jumped into the cloud computing ring, more recently became an ISP (Internet Service Provider) by rolling out fiber-optic internet to a number of cities across the United States, and develop the Andorid OS (operating system) that runs roughly half of the world’s cell phones. Now they are looking to take over your cell phone service as well. Google just announced Project Fi, their new mobile phone service.

Google Project fi logo - a green and blue lower-case "f" and yellow "i". The dot above the "i" is white and overlaps the cross of the "f".
Google’s Project fi Logo

The new service — currently only open to a few who request an invite — offers mobile phone service for $20 per month with data starting at $30 per month for 3 GB (gigabytes) — total of $50 per month. That is a little underwhelming given that other wireless carriers offer similarly-priced plans. It is not until you add in the discounts and features they it becomes mildly intriguing. First of all they refund you for the data you did not use. So you get refunded for the amount of data you don’t use under $3. So if you only use 1 GB in a month they will refund you $20 (data is charged at $10 per GB). There are no contracts.

One of the major drawbacks of this service is the phone selection. There is none. Currently you can only use the Motorola-produced Google Nexus 6. Sorry, no Apple iPhones here.

Where this show gets somewhat more interesting is how the service works: It uses 2 networks. Google partnered with Sprint and T-Mobile — both providers use similar technology in their networks — and the phone can simply hop onto the network that has the strongest signal. This probably increases the signal strength mildly since Sprint and T-Mobile are the smaller networks operating in the U.S. The other way to make calls is over a Wi-Fi network (including the many open networks available at restaurants, coffee shops, airports, and other offices and retail stores nationwide). However, even that is not new: T-Mobile already offers a service that allows for calls over a Wi-Fi connection.

On the plus side if you travel a lot it could be a sigh of relef. Some other mobile service providers make you jump through hoops, pay a little to a lot more for service and/or data, or simply don’t offer service in other countries. This new plan from Google works in more than 120 countries (since Sprint and T-Mobile use the same wireless technology the majority of service providers outside the U.S. use it is more compatible) though data speed is limited since only 3G connections will work. They also do not charge any more for data when traveling. It’s still the same $10 per GB. International calling rate of $0.20 per minute apply. No extra charges for texting internationally.

It’s an modest start — it’s not likely to cause a mass-exodus from other cell service providers — but will be interesting to see how their service evolves.

YouTube Has Gone Native!

The logo/badge developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) for HTML5.

Today the Google-owned YouTube video-on-demand (VOD) and live streaming service that brought you kittens in teacups has switched to using the HTML5 native video tag by default. What does this mean? Up till now the majority of videos on YouTube have required the Adobe-produced Shockwave Flash plugin to play videos. However, over the years browser… Continue reading YouTube Has Gone Native!